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10 Best Things to Do in Utah National Parks

Rock arches, slot canyons and petroglyphs top the list.


Zion

Arches

Bryce Canyon

Canyonlands

Hiker in the Needles section of Canyonlands National Park

Heart-Pounding Adventures in Arches and Canyonlands

Push your limits on these challenging activities including biking the White Rim Trail, hiking the Fiery Furnace, rafting Cataract Canyon and backpacking the Big Needles Loop.

Capitol Reef

FAQs

Road Trips

Maps

Scenic Drives

Weather

Hiking in the Virgin River as it runs through the Narrows, a slot canyon in Zion National Park

Be Aware of Flash Flood Dangers in Utah’s Canyons

Although Utah's river canyons are typically mild, flash floods can occur and are dangerous when they do. Zion National Park has had some flood tragedies.

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5 Things to Know About Utah National Park Travel Amid COVID-19

How to Be an Informed and Mindful Traveler

While the national parks reopening during the past two years have made us optimistic about summer travel, we’ve identified 5 essential factors you should consider before you hit the road. And one last thing. Throw your propensity to assume out the window. As we’ve seen during the past two years, there are no guarantees that businesses will stay open, virus cases will go down or stay-at-home orders will be a thing of the past.

1. Every state has its own rules that vary dramatically.

Each state has different quarantine orders that vary dramatically from state to state. Within states, orders can even vary from county to county or town to town. For instance, if you pass through the Navajo Nation, you must wear a face mask.

2. Not everything in the park will be open.

Just because a national park reopens does not mean everything within the park is open. Staffing challenges may mean that there are limited services available. Be sure to check each park website to ensure that the services you need are available. Lastly, avoiding crowds and practicing Leave No Trace principles in the park are more essential now than ever with reduced park staff. We’ve teamed up with organizations and brands across the outdoor industry to help you make smart decisions on recreating to keep yourself and others healthy and to keep access to our beloved public places open. You can read more about how to #RecreateResponsibly.

3. Every town and local business is operating differently in this new normal.

Do advance research on what hotels and restaurants are open and what they are doing to keep customers and employees safe. Some restaurants may only offer take out. Others might have a long waiting list because they have fewer tables because of staffing shortages.  If you have a choice between local businesses and a national chain, consider supporting the local business.

4. Be mindful that you’re a visitor in someone’s hometown.

While you may feel footloose and fancy free after being cooped up for two years, don’t throw caution to the wind. People live in the towns you’re traveling through and they want to feel safe as they open up their economies. Many have tiny medical centers and are miles from the nearest full-service hospital. If a store posts a sign asking all customers to wear face masks, put on your face mask. Be the traveler you’d want to see visiting your town.