Zion May Change Canyoneering Permits After Review of Tragedy

Zion's Chief Park Ranger stated, "We need to evaluate what happened. We also want to know, did we do something wrong? Could we make it better?
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Zion's Chief Park Ranger stated, "We need to evaluate what happened. We also want to know, did we do something wrong? Could we make it better?
Zion Narrows on the Virgin River.

Zion Narrows

The National Park Service in Zion National Park is reviewing its canyon permitting process in light of the recent flash flood tragedy killing seven people. Currently weather conditions from the National Weather Service are posted on the permits but rangers do not make the determination on who is capable of taking a canyoneering trip.

In an interview with Fox News, Cindy Purcell, Zion's Chief Park Ranger stated, "We need to evaluate what happened. We also want to know, did we do something wrong? Could we make it better? How could we improve... improve upon our operations? How could we instill in the public the requirement to be situationally aware and to really take on a risky trip with their eyes wide open?"

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