4 Things to See at Capitol Reef National Park - My Utah Parks

4 Things to See at Capitol Reef National Park

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The best viewpoints, trails, and attractions in this under-the-radar park.

Fruita Historic District

The Fruita orchard and barn at Capitol Reef National Park

The Fruita orchard and barn at Capitol Reef National Park

Step back to the time of frontier pioneers at the preserved Fruita settlement, site of a small community from the 1880s to early 1940s.

Visit the Gifford House, built in 1908 by a Mormon settler and occupied until the late ‘60s, for a glimpse of life in historic Fruita. The home now holds a small gift shop and bakery, famous for its delicious pies.

The park maintains the fruit orchards planted by early residents, including apple, peach, pear, and cherry trees, and a one-room schoolhouse still stands in the area.

The Fruita Historic District is located just east of the park’s visitor center.

Sunset Point

Sunset Point in Capitol Reef National Park

Sunset Point in Capitol Reef National Park

The place to be when the sun goes down, Sunset Point has dramatic views over Capitol Reef’s rock formations and lovely evening light.

To reach it, head to the Goosenecks Overlook and pick up the Sunset Point Trail from the parking lot. A short (.3-mile) trail leads right to the overlook.

Rim Overlook Trail

Waterpocket Fold as seen from Strike Valley Overlook in Capitol Reef National Park

Waterpocket Fold as seen from Strike Valley Overlook in Capitol Reef National Park

Hikers looking for excellent views—including the Fruita Historic District, the Waterpocket Fold formation, and rock domes—should head to this 2.3-mile (one-way) trail that leads to a vista 1,000 feet over the park.

Pick it up at the Hickman Bridge trailhead in the Fruita Historic District.

Cassidy Arch

Cassidy Arch in Capitol Reef National Park. Photo by John Fowler [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Cassidy Arch in Capitol Reef National Park. Photo by John Fowler [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Climb 670 feet from the Grand Wash Road trailhead to a view overlooking Cassidy Arch (named after Butch Cassidy, the famous outlaw who hid out in the area), a thick rock span. The 1.8-mile (one-way) trail skirts sheer drops and passes striped rock walls en route to the arch.

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